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Fifa World Cup Lesson Plans

Fifa World Cup Lesson Plans

Could a good public relations strategy help London replicate Rio's double sporting win?    by Katie Matthews

Last week Rio de Janeiro made history by being announced as the chosen city to host the Olympic Games in 2016, meaning that the Games will be held in South America for the first time in the competition's 113 year history.

The awarding of the event to Rio was a triumph for the Brazilian President, Luiz Inacio Lila da Silva, who had fought long and hard to bring the Games to the city. As well as putting a comprehensive, imaginative and exciting pitch together, da Silva also handled the public relations requirements of his country's bid impressively.

Whilst Barack Obama (who was of course championing the Chicago bid) was ridiculed by some parts of the international media for turning up to the vote to make a quick speech, in the 'arrogant belief' that that would help swing it in America's favour, da Silva had no such reputation management issues because of all the leg work he did as part of the Rio bid preparation. He visited the Olympic organising committees in both Beijing and London in person and attended several of the IOC technical meetings that were held in the run up to the final vote.

So, thanks to this meticulously planned and perfectly executed bid Brazil has achieved something extraordinary in the sporting world. Not only will they become the first South American nation to host an Olympic Games, they will also become one of the few nations to host two of the world's biggest sporting events back-to-back (the World Cup is due to be held in the iconic city in 2014).

This is particularly impressive because there has always been a reluctance to schedule these two major sporting events in one city in such quick succession - both the Olympics and football are supposed to be international events after all - but if Brazil can do it, why not England? England have been shortlisted along with the USA, Russia and Spain as potential hosts for the World Cup in 2018, but many see the fact that the 2012 Olympics are taking place in London as a disadvantage for the England camp.

However, those behind the bid will undoubtedly be learning lessons from da Silva's perfectly pitched campaign (after all, Brazil already had the World Cup in 2016 signed, sealed and delivered when the IOC voted in their favour earlier this week) and, with some clever marketing and some effective public relations, England's World Cup bid team could turn Brazil's double win to their advantage.

First of all, Brazil has now set a very recent precedent that would suggest hosting these two events in one country within close proximity of one another is not an obstacle in itself. If communicated effectively, this could wipe out one of the disadvantages that the England bid team face. The sports PR agencies involved in the bidding process should also be 'talking up' the advantages of opting for a country which has recently hosted another major sporting event. Despite some early misgivings about budget, the London Olympic team are now on schedule to deliver the necessary infrastructure on time and within its new budget limitations. The fact that England are hosting the Olympics also helps to demonstrate the sporting passion of the nation, and the government's enthusiasm, support aond commitment to delivering succesful large scale sporting events.

Of course, England will have to do a lot more than this to win the opportunity to host the World Cup, especially in light of yesterday's comments from Fifa vice president, Jack Warner, who said that England's bid team had so far failed to impress or catch the eye of key personnel. Interestingly, Warner highlighted the lack of use of high profile individuals such as David Beckham, as one of the England team's major downfalls in the process so far, thus suggesting that this is a man (and therefore a governing body) who is very susceptible to the effects of public relations, especially when sports stars are used for publicity purposes.

It will not be until December next year that the winner of the World Cup bid will be announced, and we therefore find out whether or not England have followed in Brazil's footsteps and also managed to land the double, but what we do know now is that effective PR is going to be a crucial element of any successful bid.

About the Author

Katie Matthews is working in an public relations company in UK and recommends you to visit http://www.pha-media.com/

Fifa World Cup Lesson Plans

Could a good public relations strategy help London replicate Rio's double sporting win?    by Katie Matthews

Last week Rio de Janeiro made history by being announced as the chosen city to host the Olympic Games in 2016, meaning that the Games will be held in South America for the first time in the competition's 113 year history.

The awarding of the event to Rio was a triumph for the Brazilian President, Luiz Inacio Lila da Silva, who had fought long and hard to bring the Games to the city. As well as putting a comprehensive, imaginative and exciting pitch together, da Silva also handled the public relations requirements of his country's bid impressively.

Whilst Barack Obama (who was of course championing the Chicago bid) was ridiculed by some parts of the international media for turning up to the vote to make a quick speech, in the 'arrogant belief' that that would help swing it in America's favour, da Silva had no such reputation management issues because of all the leg work he did as part of the Rio bid preparation. He visited the Olympic organising committees in both Beijing and London in person and attended several of the IOC technical meetings that were held in the run up to the final vote.

So, thanks to this meticulously planned and perfectly executed bid Brazil has achieved something extraordinary in the sporting world. Not only will they become the first South American nation to host an Olympic Games, they will also become one of the few nations to host two of the world's biggest sporting events back-to-back (the World Cup is due to be held in the iconic city in 2014).

This is particularly impressive because there has always been a reluctance to schedule these two major sporting events in one city in such quick succession - both the Olympics and football are supposed to be international events after all - but if Brazil can do it, why not England? England have been shortlisted along with the USA, Russia and Spain as potential hosts for the World Cup in 2018, but many see the fact that the 2012 Olympics are taking place in London as a disadvantage for the England camp.

However, those behind the bid will undoubtedly be learning lessons from da Silva's perfectly pitched campaign (after all, Brazil already had the World Cup in 2016 signed, sealed and delivered when the IOC voted in their favour earlier this week) and, with some clever marketing and some effective public relations, England's World Cup bid team could turn Brazil's double win to their advantage.

First of all, Brazil has now set a very recent precedent that would suggest hosting these two events in one country within close proximity of one another is not an obstacle in itself. If communicated effectively, this could wipe out one of the disadvantages that the England bid team face. The sports PR agencies involved in the bidding process should also be 'talking up' the advantages of opting for a country which has recently hosted another major sporting event. Despite some early misgivings about budget, the London Olympic team are now on schedule to deliver the necessary infrastructure on time and within its new budget limitations. The fact that England are hosting the Olympics also helps to demonstrate the sporting passion of the nation, and the government's enthusiasm, support aond commitment to delivering succesful large scale sporting events.

Of course, England will have to do a lot more than this to win the opportunity to host the World Cup, especially in light of yesterday's comments from Fifa vice president, Jack Warner, who said that England's bid team had so far failed to impress or catch the eye of key personnel. Interestingly, Warner highlighted the lack of use of high profile individuals such as David Beckham, as one of the England team's major downfalls in the process so far, thus suggesting that this is a man (and therefore a governing body) who is very susceptible to the effects of public relations, especially when sports stars are used for publicity purposes.

It will not be until December next year that the winner of the World Cup bid will be announced, and we therefore find out whether or not England have followed in Brazil's footsteps and also managed to land the double, but what we do know now is that effective PR is going to be a crucial element of any successful bid.

About the Author

Katie Matthews is working in an public relations company in UK and recommends you to visit http://www.pha-media.com/
Fifa World Cup Lesson Plans

Could a good public relations strategy help London replicate Rio's double sporting win?    by Katie Matthews

Last week Rio de Janeiro made history by being announced as the chosen city to host the Olympic Games in 2016, meaning that the Games will be held in South America for the first time in the competition's 113 year history.

The awarding of the event to Rio was a triumph for the Brazilian President, Luiz Inacio Lila da Silva, who had fought long and hard to bring the Games to the city. As well as putting a comprehensive, imaginative and exciting pitch together, da Silva also handled the public relations requirements of his country's bid impressively.

Whilst Barack Obama (who was of course championing the Chicago bid) was ridiculed by some parts of the international media for turning up to the vote to make a quick speech, in the 'arrogant belief' that that would help swing it in America's favour, da Silva had no such reputation management issues because of all the leg work he did as part of the Rio bid preparation. He visited the Olympic organising committees in both Beijing and London in person and attended several of the IOC technical meetings that were held in the run up to the final vote.

So, thanks to this meticulously planned and perfectly executed bid Brazil has achieved something extraordinary in the sporting world. Not only will they become the first South American nation to host an Olympic Games, they will also become one of the few nations to host two of the world's biggest sporting events back-to-back (the World Cup is due to be held in the iconic city in 2014).

This is particularly impressive because there has always been a reluctance to schedule these two major sporting events in one city in such quick succession - both the Olympics and football are supposed to be international events after all - but if Brazil can do it, why not England? England have been shortlisted along with the USA, Russia and Spain as potential hosts for the World Cup in 2018, but many see the fact that the 2012 Olympics are taking place in London as a disadvantage for the England camp.

However, those behind the bid will undoubtedly be learning lessons from da Silva's perfectly pitched campaign (after all, Brazil already had the World Cup in 2016 signed, sealed and delivered when the IOC voted in their favour earlier this week) and, with some clever marketing and some effective public relations, England's World Cup bid team could turn Brazil's double win to their advantage.

First of all, Brazil has now set a very recent precedent that would suggest hosting these two events in one country within close proximity of one another is not an obstacle in itself. If communicated effectively, this could wipe out one of the disadvantages that the England bid team face. The sports PR agencies involved in the bidding process should also be 'talking up' the advantages of opting for a country which has recently hosted another major sporting event. Despite some early misgivings about budget, the London Olympic team are now on schedule to deliver the necessary infrastructure on time and within its new budget limitations. The fact that England are hosting the Olympics also helps to demonstrate the sporting passion of the nation, and the government's enthusiasm, support aond commitment to delivering succesful large scale sporting events.

Of course, England will have to do a lot more than this to win the opportunity to host the World Cup, especially in light of yesterday's comments from Fifa vice president, Jack Warner, who said that England's bid team had so far failed to impress or catch the eye of key personnel. Interestingly, Warner highlighted the lack of use of high profile individuals such as David Beckham, as one of the England team's major downfalls in the process so far, thus suggesting that this is a man (and therefore a governing body) who is very susceptible to the effects of public relations, especially when sports stars are used for publicity purposes.

It will not be until December next year that the winner of the World Cup bid will be announced, and we therefore find out whether or not England have followed in Brazil's footsteps and also managed to land the double, but what we do know now is that effective PR is going to be a crucial element of any successful bid.

About the Author

Katie Matthews is working in an public relations company in UK and recommends you to visit http://www.pha-media.com/

STUNNER!: The influence of 2006 FIFA World Cup Video Game on a young boy by Brook Pittinger

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